Course Descriptions (Page 2)
HIST 301 Native American History, 1500-1800
An exploration of the history of the indigeous peoples of the Americas from first contact to the Age of Revolutions. The course focuses on native cultures of North and South America, the consequences of contact with European explorers and settlers, and the accommodation and resistance of native peoples as the Americas became sites of struggle among European imperial powers.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 302 Colonial America
A study of the transfer of Old World cultures (especially British) to America, their interaction with the New World environment and peoples, and the subsequent evolution of distinctive political, economic, and cultural orders. Community building and related issues of gender, race, and class are emphasized.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 304 The American Revolution
A social, political, military, and diplomatic history of the emerging United States from 1763 to 1787. The course focuses on the causes and consequences of the War of Independence. The revolutionary nature of the period is considered within the context of the larger Atlantic world.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 306 Jeffersonian through Jacksonian America
A study of a vital transitional epoch in American history from the Federalist era to the age of Jackson. Especially stressed is the shift from deferential to greater democracy in politics, economics, and religion. Related matters of social reform, race, and gender are also considered.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.


HIST 308 American Civil War Era
An intensive analysis of the social, political and economic factors in antebellum America that led to the Civil War, the war itself, and the problems of reconstructing the nation after the war.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 309 Modern United States History: 1945 to the Present
An in-depth study of the United States since 1945. Topics examined may include the Cold War, the rights revolution, social, cultural, and political changes wrought by the Vietnam Era and Watergate, the rise of the New Right, and the disintegration of the New Deal social contract.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 310 Emergence of a Modern Nation A study of United States history from 1877-1920. Topics include the change in the national spirit from the Gilded Age to the rise of industrialism, imperialism, and World War I. Special emphasis is given to the dominant roles of Theodore Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson in transforming the nation.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.


HIST 314 United States Diplomatic History
A presentation of the evolution of America’s major foreign policies. Among the factors considered in the formulation of American diplomacy are economic concerns, cultural attitudes, the role of individuals, the nation’s constitutional basis, as well as foreign events.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

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